• JTF

Freedom in the Sky


Flying is beautiful, one of the most unique and releasing experiences that anyone can ever have. In the sky, space and time disappear. From altitude, one can have a moment to detach, to relax, to accept, to reflect. The feat of engineering required for flying makes it all the more amazing.

Cotton candy over the sky, clouds shape and morph. The horizon is calling, the sun shining on the blue sky above and into the bed of clouds below. The thought of being able to get in one place and end up on another completely different is fascinating; there is romance and a unique desire for flight.

Humankind fascination with the sky goes back to time immemorial, with the earliest records of aerodynamics dating about 2000 years ago with kites' creation and other devices to harvest the elements and take to the sky. From everyday contemplation of the stars to a spiritual association, to the desire to fly; Individuals' fascination with the sky has existed for a lot longer than their ability to reach for it. The earliest record of someone achieving that feat goes back to 1903, making the experience just over a century old.

From Isaac Newtown's laws of motion to Daniel Bernoulli's principle in the XVIII century, the science behind the ability to create lift has evolved into today's aeronautical industry. While it may be one of the youngest technological developments to arrive, the explosion and advancement in aeronautics have been among the fastest and most impressive feats in human history. It is then no surprise that kids are often fascinated with becoming a pilot and taking flight themselves.

Even though military and commercial private or public aviation often make headlines, there is a small industry segment devoted to private aircrafts and those who fly them. The industry continues to grow despite the significant setbacks brought upon after the events of September 11, which created new regulations, restrictions, and an increase in cost. For those willing to go through the hassle and fortunate enough to afford it, it is still one of the most sought after activities by people who are fascinated with mechanics, physics, and the sky that draws them to look up and lose themselves in the clouds.

To fly is to be free, to defy gravity, and allow the spirit to challenge all preconceptions of what can and cannot be done. It is a reminder to keep the childhood innocence and ingenuity required to take flight. It is an analogy of life; it requires work and preparation. It cannot be rushed and needs to be carefully curated to be successful, yet once everything is said and done, it's about contemplation.